Australian Construction Industry Sees Substantial Growth

Construction Industry employment levels reach record levels in Australia

National employment figures for workers in the Australian construction industry, has dramatically increased by 28,200 in the three months to February 2014 to reach 1,037 million. This is the highest level recorded and an impressive 2.3 percent above previous records for the same time period last year, according to comprehensive labour force data presented by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

New South Wales has been accredited with driving the escalation, and boasts 27,900 new construction workers amongst a robust rebound in housing figures and the continued improvement of commercial conditions with strong interest and increased investment in transport and roads.

Construction worker shortages remain a real concern

These latest job surges have again raised concerns with analysts’ of an impending shortage of tradespeople and other construction workers as building activity increases throughout Australia.

Slow construction activity in recent years has unavoidably led to decreased numbers of apprentices that have been trained and noticeable shortages of skilled construction workers.

Housing Industry Association Senior Economist Shane Garrett suggests that whilst supply and demand for tradespeople is generally considered steady, shortages emerging in trades like bricklaying, tiling and roofing coupled with an upward burden on wages and other associated construction costs will likely intensify as building activity with Australia recovers.

These recent statistics do rely on how rapidly current workers that are returning to construction jobs from resource projects can be up-skilled to work on housing and how speedily the industry can support the numbers of apprentices and other workers coming through.

In addition we can see from other statistics that an a national level, almost 65 percent of workers were employed in ‘construction services’ (666,800 people), 25 percent in building construction (261,200) and 8.4 percent (87,200) in heavy and civil engineering construction, of which around 911,500 men were employed compared with 125,900 women, denoting that men outnumber women in the construction industry by more than seven to one.

How can you benefit from recent growth in construction work around Australia?

With a growing need for workers to remain current and relevant, it will require an increased commitment by Registered Training Organisations (RTO’s) to provide the training for High Risk Work Licences.

Having met these challenges, many RTO’s are able to provide all that you need for the required training and assessment of High Risk work Licences and other construction based training.

When selecting to train for any High Risk Work Licence be certain to choose a reputable Registered Training Organisation (RTO) that is a recognised leader for their training and assessment outcomes. Elect to train with an RTO that has opted to provide smaller class sizes for High Risk Work Licences and who has taken the effort to provide the mandatory requirements for training and assessment. Choose quality over quantity and be sure to ask that the training you receive incorporates all Australian safety requirements, comprehensive lifting applications, installation and use of equipment, hazard recognition and risk control methods, as well as height safety methods all whilst maintaining regulatory compliance.

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